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I got my flu shot early this winter. I know I did. My son got his also and we both agreed it was totally painless. We were prepared and we anticipated the dreaded winter illness with our armors on. So far it's worked for him and I pray that continues. As for myself...well, I believe my luck may not be as solid as his. I have had a headache since Friday and awoke with an ear ache, sore throat, and nausea this morning. Thank goodness we had a snow day. I just do not think I can take a "sick day" from school with a clear conscious. We have missed so many days of school this year because of Mother Nature's desire to provide the first real winter we have had in a while. With any luck I will rise tomorrow with no residual effects of today's ickiness.That was two weeks ago. Last week a flu of a different kind ravaged my body. This time the chills were accompanied by diarhea, fever, and nausea; as well as two nights of restless sleep and painful leg aches. Unfortuna

MS Sucks

I ran into a fellow MS sufferer today. When she asked about my meds, I admitted that I stopped "using" three years ago this February. She, too, is no longer "shooting up"; We agreed that this was probably the best decision we had made in our individual journeys with Multipled Sclerosis. The symptoms we suffered while self-injecting still plague us, but with little to no progression. We are saving money and free of the chemicals that filled our bodies back then and getting to the bathroom in time is just as difficult now as it was then. We still have MS and we still feel lousy but without the additional side-effects that medication often  creates. I guess that's a good thing; but rather disheartening in the battle against this horrible disease. Another friend halted meds several years ago, mainly because of the expense and the lack of insurance assistance. Her symptoms were and are quite a bit different from mine. She is now in a wheelchair and unable to totally

Happy Birthday to Me

Fifty-five years ago today God gave my parents a perfect little prize (yep, I'm selling it!). I was born on my paternal grandmother's birthday and spent most of my growing up years attempting (and failing miserably) to emulate that southern grace that demanded immediate attention. She was a lovely lady, and never without her perfectly applied coral or rose hued nail polish. Her shoes always matched her dress and her hair was never out of place. Gurney was the poster person of elegance. Thirteen years ago any hope of growing old gracefully (as did my grandmother) was shot down without warning, nor the consideration of preparation. At that point my closet full of designer high heals joined in a chorus of "mwaa ha ha's" while I was crawling home from my last walk to the public library. (If you don't know my story, it can be read on my How Are You Dealing with the Winter Weather? post.) MS grounded me to the life of flat heals and securely fastened foot wear. Wi

Superbowl Safety and MS

  Do not be misled by the title of this post. I am not and never would refer to multiple sclerosis as super. I am upbeat (yes, I am), but I am  not an idiot. There is really nothing wonderful about MS, but we must encourage a positive attitude. Right?   Watching the Super Bowl last evening was not extremely entertaining and I even found myself wishing Seattle would just make it the first ever Superbowl Shut out in history, just to have soemthing positive to say about the sadness of competitive fun. I didn't really care who won, although I would have enjoyed seeing Peyton adda nother ring to his jewelry chest. I just wanted to see a good game.   With MS I do care who wins and my game plan is to come out the victor. I don't even want a "good game" because the novelty of living with MS wanes very quickly. In the beginning we experiment, test, challenge, and get a feel for our symptoms and various treatments. I have read about bee venom treatments and electrical storm exp

Superbowl Safety and MS

  Do not be misled by the title of this post. I am not and never would refer to multiple sclerosis as super. I am upbeat (yes, I am), but I am  not an idiot. There is really nothing wonderful about MS, but we must encourage a positive attitude. Right?   Watching the Super Bowl last evening was not extremely entertaining and I even found myself wishing Seattle would just make it the first ever Superbowl Shut out in history, just to have soemthing positive to say about the sadness of competitive fun. I didn't really care who won, although I would have enjoyed seeing Peyton adda nother ring to his jewelry chest. I just wanted to see a good game.   With MS I do care who wins and my game plan is to come out the victor. I don't even want a "good game" because the novelty of living with MS wanes very quickly. In the beginning we experiment, test, challenge, and get a feel for our symptoms and various treatments. I have read about bee venom treatments and electric

Care for a little w(h)ine with your MS?

Any time we do not feel well is a cause for depression, isn't it? We just don't like to be feel yucky and it is so very easy to allow negtivity to creep in and dictate how we deal with it. Multiple Sclerosis is for sure an illness that invites those negative thoughts to invade and take up residence in our minds and bodies. But MS should not dictate little pleasures that life throws us. For many of us alcohol consumption is not a priority or even an issue; but there are those folks who feel that drinking a few questionable beverages can do not harm. I mean, we already stumble, sway and slur through our daily  business, why not add a visible reason for our "inebriation"? At least an alcohol level is understandable to the rest of the world that does not understand MS. Boy-oh-boy, that's an ironic statement if I ever made one. There is nothing understandable about MS. Why am I able to walk well enough to hold a full-time job when my younger friend is confined to w

How are you dealing with the winter weather?

I don't know about you, but my favorite season is winter and I am absolutely loving this snowy winter. I didn't always like the cold and the snow. In my youth I was a serious sun worshipper. My first job was as a life guard at a local private swimming pool. I enjoyed this gig for nearly 10 years and I had a strict rule. On the first day of pool season I felt it was my duty to get as much  sun as possible. For some reason I thought that if I aquired a harsh sun burn on the first day, I wouldn't burn again for the rest of ther summer. This is not good advice. The skiin will continue to burn all summer long and the damage acrued is permenant. There is no turning back once the human skin is fried in baby oil and iodine (yep, that's how serious I was about my tan). But, this space is about MS, not skin cancer. I have yet to look forward to that condition.   While I basked in my summer glow and dreamed of living at the beach when I was an independent young adult, I never once