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Making sense of Yesterday


First of all I need to thank anyone who read my rather depressing post yesterday. I won't apologize for demonstrating a human side of me, but I am sorry for making public such a weakness. Life is too short for boo-hoo-ing, whether it is deserved or not.



Secondly, I DO apologize for such a confusing post. I bare my soul then I include a link for the benefits of performing the full squat? Actually that kind of makes sense, what with the tone of my rant. The MonSter is always predictable in the confusion department.


For those physically active readers, let's look at the correlation between performing a full squat and living with multiple sclerosis. You might want to re-visit yesterday's post to review the link.

                                         Image result for images of full squats

According to the article, FULL SQUATS...

* build bigger, stronger muscles
* increase vertical jump
* train lower back for stability
* build bone
* build healthy knees
* require flexibility, thus promoting flexibility of hips, legs, and spine

With my physical condition constantly on my mind, the similarities do not escape me. My two biggest issues with multiple sclerosis are incontinence and the inability to walk well.

STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • Squats are mostly known as a leg exercise, but they promote body-wide muscle building by catalyzing an anabolic environment
  • Squats are also one of the best functional exercises out there, promoting mobility and balance and helping you complete real-world activities with ease
  • Squats also help you to burn more fat, as one of the most time-efficient ways to burn more calories continually is by developing more muscle
  • Squats have long been criticized for being destructive to your knees, but research shows that when done properly, squats actually improve knee stability and strengthen connective tissue
  • Squats are one type of exercise that should be a part of virtually everyone’s fitness routine, as they provide whole-body benefits
  • https://fitness.mercola.com/how-to-do-squats.aspx

Doing a full squat cannot help with my first complaint, but the more I concentrate on physical exercise, the better I can walk. Through physical therapy a few times a week, I find myself building stronger muscles in all the right places; namely my thighs, back, and quads. One of my exercises, of course, is the squat. I started out only lowering myself a few inches, but my goal is to continue slowly moving further and further down toward my heals. I do't always reach  my goal, but I don't stop moving and I don't give up. Back straight, knees over my feet, and hands near a safety bar just in case, I do 3-4 sets of twenty every day. 

I really don't care if this activity increases my "vertical jump" because I really don't plan to do any jumping, vertical or otherwise, but I'm happy that I am training for the possibility. My biggest interest in the benefits of the full squat are those that include flexibility, muscle strength and healthy knees.

So, that's my little tidbit for today. 

Since this is rather short today, you have time to click on the link below for a chance to win MS freebies. 

See you tomorrow,
Lisa, The Lady with the Cane

https://multiplesclerosis.net/living-with-ms/giveaway-awareness/?utm_source=weekly&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=cb037187-f5ce-4d02-80de-18de1eabf62c&utm_confid=sovifjrls&aGVhbHRoIHVuaW9uIGJsYWg=937a3d5adf7285ffbc521d7764970b536e8f8addd92b01d6b1645939bb596620

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