Skip to main content

Finding the Neurologist for You

A French neurologist named Jean Martin Charcot was the first person that actually recognized Multiple Sclerosis as a disease in the year of 1868. That was probably a very forward thing to do, considering that as recently as the 1950's individuals were still being institutionalized for their inexplicable symptoms. I can only imagine the number of men and women who were condemned as witches during those days in Salem. (This actually sounds like a good research topic. Hmmm...)

I thank Jean Martin Charcot, though, for stepping up to the plate and announcing to the world that Multiple Sclerosis is a documented disease. For anyone who was aware of this proclamation at the time,  I am certain that their appreciation was strongly felt.

Unfortunately, even with medical documentation, MS is still ridiculed as a "catch-all" for all of the unexplained symptoms and actions associated with the mysteries of the condition. I am so excited to be seeing my original neurologist in a few weeks in hopes that he has more information to share. Dr. Robert Lewis was a mere intern when we first met. He was studying under the experts at Ruby Memorial Hospital in Morgantown, West Virginia, specializing in neurology, and, of course, a Mountaineer fan. I tell you this mostly because from the upper windows at this hospital one can enjoy a spectacular view of Milan Puscar Stadium, home of the WVU Mountaineers. That is not what honed my affections for Dr. Bob, though. He was young, enthusiastic, newly married, an expectant father, and originally from the southern part of West Virginia, my family's stomping grounds. And he cared...with ever inch of his being...about helping me work with my newly diagnosed disease. In my mind, Dr. Robert Lewis was the closest thing, in my time of need, to God. (My eyes are flooded with tears just thinking about it.)

As his first MS patient, I was definitely a big part of his studies, but he did not once treat me as a lab experiment. His bed side manner got me through my first, and second, spinal tap. He reassured me, but did not not pamper me in that demoralizing way that some medical professionals see as comfort. We talked about my six month old son and his own new born. We even kind of giggled about our name choices. I named my son Boone in honor of my family's home county. He named his son Guido. Why? I still do not know. A very mob name for a sweet, innocent southern boy, don't you think? Dr. Bob was there for me when I needed him most. He moved on in his studies and his practice, leaving me with a confidence that I could "do this thing".

And for many years I did; but I always wondered about the guy who so lovingly had taken my spinal fluid virginity. And, after more than a decade, I have found him. I imagine the two of us, arms reaching and flowers floating in the air around us, falling into one anothers' arms. I will declare my undying love for him, as he gently strokes my tear sodden cheek and inquires about my incontinence.

SCREECH!

I do not even know if he will truly remember me, but there is no doubt that he has made a definitive impact on my life. There have been an assortment of neurologists and specialists in my life since my relationship with Dr. Bob, but none can compare with my feelings toward this fellow. It's that "first love" thing to some degree and the fact that his youthful enthusiasm was contagious. I can relate, as I am certain we all can. In the first years of being a classroom teacher, I know I went overboard to be the very best teacher I could be. I am not saying that the years lessen this need to succeed, but I know that we all settle into our jobs and sometimes become a bit lax in our approach. I will not criticize Dr. Bob for not remembering me, but I have to admit that I probably will feel some disappointment. (A GREAT deal of disappointment. I mean, after all we meant to one another...)

The point of all of this (and there really is a point) is that it is absolutely imperative that we find a neurologist who makes us feels worthy of continuing on with life, MS or not. Where Dr. Bob left me in order  to continue his studies and advance his career, he also did so because that was the next chapter in his life; and he left me with a confidence that I, too, could handle my next chapter. That euphoria lasted a while, until I again needed that reassurance that I could "do this thing". And, then...I became a number. I continuously spouted out data that was already recorded in the medical files; and I self-diagnosed and treated my own symptoms. I am not saying that after Dr. Bob no one cared, but that "home visit" feel was gone. And thank goodness I have the where-withal to research my own disease! It is a little frightening when I am reporting to my doctors the best way to treat my condition. My teacher's pay check certainly does not reflect the income that some (most) of these professionals bring home.

So, 'nuff said. Dr. Bob is located a distance from me now, but it is worth it to me to take a day off from work and travel down interstate 79 to find him. (And, no, I am NOT telling you where he is. I saw him first! Besides, that is what Goggle is for.) At this stage in the game, I prefer taking this time out of my day in order to revisit a piece of mind that has since been removed from my life. Maybe I will be disappointed; maybe I will continue to self-diagnose; maybe Dr. Bob no longer concentrates on MS related studies; maybe Guido is the Godfather of Cable County.  I am excited to find out. And I am excited that Jean Martin Charcot made all of this possible.


Follow me:
https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Abby/176985712352706

Find Abby on Amazon
http://www.amazon.com/Abby-Lisa-McCombs-ebook/dp/B00I0F7FS2/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1406813264&sr=1-1&keywords=Abby+by+LIsa+A.+McCombs

Love and Light,
Lisa


Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

A Sea of Orange Hope

With a forecast for rain and cool temperatures, many felt the 2018 Walk for MS might be a sloppy mess; but when I arrives in Morgantown, West Virginia, I found an optimistic, celebratory atmosphere that no storm could dampen. Clouds dispersed and skies cleared, knowing that the heavens  could not compete with the storm happening on the ground at the  Waterfront.







The true champions had arrived and their name was Warrior.



Tents were erected, tables arranged, team shirt distributed, books stacked, (I got to share I Have MS. What's Your super Power? !!!!)






acknowledgements made, participants in place, and the walk began,






















with Team Tiffany in the lead. My new MS friend, Tiffany Albright, is an inspiration. she single-handedly recruited an amazing team of walkers that outnumbered any other congregation in attendance. Her numbers were amazing in monetary contributions and the enthusiasm of her teammates was more than inspiring. 

Event though I did not personally join the walkers, my day was fu…

MS and Exercise

I don't know about you, but sometimes (most of the time) the motivation to exercise is just not there. And that is just plain crazy.

I am more than aware of the positive effects of daily exercise. I always feels better, both physically and mentally, after taking time to stretch, bend, and force my body to meet the challenge of movement. My biggest issue is the accountability. Exercising alone means no one can attest to your commitment. Unfortunately group gym, spa, or class situations are not financially nor logically an option for many of us.

And sometimes, like this morning, it is even an effort to fire up the DVD player in order to access one of my many yoga videos. Even though that cute little blond instructor coos encouraging words my way, her interest in me is purely superficial. We know nothing about one another. 

According to healthcare.com the following chart shows the seven best exercises for living with MS. They are easy, doable and require no equipment or additional cost.…

Aubagio Followup

WOW!

Last evening I attended an area meeting to learn more about Aubagio, one of the three oral MS medications on the market. General MS physician Mark Hospodar provided the informational portion of the session, complete with a slide presentation full of facts about multiple sclerosis. It was very basic and mostly repetitive for those pro-active MS sponges. Not mind-blowing stuff, but pretty heavy on the importance of medicating upon diagnosis.
Enough to convince me to take a closer look at my own choice to remain MS drug free.

It was an intimate group of approximately a dozen women plus the doctor. Very relaxed, informal, and free of judgement. We were all there for the same reason with the same goal in mind: to discover the "wonder" drug, or at least something closer to a promised remedy. (In addition to the fantastic Italian cuisine at Muriale's Restaurant. Yum!:)

We heard from Aubagio veteran, Renee, who told her journey with her initial diagnosis s well as her life with …